Easy as Pie (I have made one pie. It was not easy.)

First, I would like to apologize for the poor documentation I did at the beginning of this project. I had no idea how compelling my crafting journey would be.

Several months ago I was perusing the Internet for responsibility charts for the kiddos. I balked at the Etsy prices and decided we could create our own. I thought long and hard about exactly how I wanted this to work. And I definitely wanted to use chalkboard paint, and magnets and fun paper and and… In the interest of full disclosure, I have zero crafting skills, but I do have a Pinterest account.

I thought these charts would be a fun addition to our summer break… and now that summer is nearly over, I decided we should make them.

Step 1:

Have kids paint their names.

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Step 2:

Make sure no farmers or tractors are within a five mile stretch of property. Kennel dogs, bring out exersaucer, set out a sheet with cookie sheets, change two diapers, grab the spray paint, put medicine on three mosquito bites on three year old, see mosquito, spray children with mosquito repellant, get chalk down for 2 year old, put baby in exersaucer, SPRAY PAINT THE COOKIE SHEETS.

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Step 3:

Get water for all kiddos, water flowers, change baby and two year old’s clothes after two year old “waters too”, tell boys to quit throwing rocks at the cookie sheets as if they were targets, SPRAY PAINT SECOND COAT OF COOKIE SHEETS, right after completing paint job notice a tractor is driving in the ditch across the road for the sole purpose of breaking up the dirt (i.e. creating a dust cloud), and suddenly realize just how stinkin’ windy it is. Grab all the kiddos and race inside before haze hits. Watch from window as your freshly painted cookie sheets are enveloped by sand. Sigh and fix lunch.

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Step 4:

While littles are napping enlist 8 year old to help cut out rectangles by telling him it is good practice for school.

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Step 5:

Realize you outlined rectangles the wrong way for some of the paper’s patterns and ask 8 year old to recut about twenty rectangles. Use this as a teachable moment about how everyone makes mistakes and we all must learn from them. Wonder how many more years until he rolls his eyes at your “teachable moments”.

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Step 6:

Remember that geometry and math are hard as you try to decipher your own lines and expectations.

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Step 7:

Find all the glue sticks.

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Step 8:

But no glue gun.

Step 9:

Rummage through junk drawer.

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Step 10:

Clean out junk drawer.

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Step 11:

Wonder if you can ever have too many black sharpies. Laugh at the thought, and look for the rest of your vast colored sharpie collection.

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Step 12:

Return to task and find all other manner for adhering things. But still no glue gun.

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Step 13:

Give up looking for the dang glue gun and use Elmers glue, and wonder what ever happened to that kid who ate glue in fourth grade. Joseph Hamilton of James Bickley Elementary, are you ok?

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Step 14:

Write out jobs, and forget for a moment that you are left handed and WILL smear the letters.

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Step 15:

Amaze 8 year old that you “actually made something”.

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Step 16:

Wonder if people are noticing your weird thumb.

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Step 18:

Remember that you are not known for your handwriting skills. Especially with chalk. Text your sister in law and ask her to write your super cute idea: “To Do” on one side and “Ta Da” on the other side.

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Step 19:

Get out the adorable thick ribbon you bought.

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Step 20:

Discover your kiddos used the adhesive part of your clips for a “project”. Use tape, instead.

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Step 21:

Realize your ribbon won’t fit in tiny clips. (Yes, I had to realize this.)

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Step 22:

Get creative. Like Macgyver.

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Wait for it…

 

 

 

(because some things really are worth waiting for. See previous post)

Yes. Southern engineering at it’s fanciest.

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Step 23:

Bask in your craft’s awesomeness, and tell your children not to touch the tactile development encouraging chore chart till daddy gets home to “fix it”.

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6 thoughts on “Easy as Pie (I have made one pie. It was not easy.)

  1. I am impresses you even took that project and really did it with four little ones! You get five gold stars.

  2. This reminds me of the books “If you give a moose a muffin.” & ” if you give a pig a party”. Love your crafts!

  3. I have six glue guns, I will throw one in the mail for you 😉 awesome job on the craft, you ARE crafty if you can do that. It’s just not your “thing” story telling is your thing 🙂

    Ps- I have wierd thumbs too.

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